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Visitation/Parent-Time

It is a modern myth that a parent who has sole legal and physical custody of a child has all parental rights and the “noncustodial” parent has no parental rights.  Wrong answer.  For Utah policy on parent-time, see http://le.utah.gov/~code/TITLE30/htm/30_03_003200.htm.

Under Utah law, the minimum “parent-time” (no longer called visitation, because a noncustodial parent doesn’t just visit their child/ren, but parents them during the time they spend with the noncustodial parent), provides (generally) for the noncustodial parent-time to be every other weekend, every other holiday, 1/2 the winter vacationbreak and 4 weeks in the summer.

In Utah, for children 5 and older, see http://le.utah.gov/~code/TITLE30/htm/30_03_003500.htm.

In Utah, for children younger than 5, see http://le.utah.gov/~code/TITLE30/htm/30_03_003505.htm.  In Utah, for parents who live further than moving 150 miles or more from the residence specified in the Utah court’s decree, see http://le.utah.gov/~code/TITLE30/htm/30_03_003700.htm.

For Utah advisory guidelines suggested to govern all parent-time arrangements between parents (which are often adopted as the law of the case in divorce decrees and are no longer “advisory” but required), see http://le.utah.gov/~code/TITLE30/htm/30_03_003300.htm.

“When parent-time has not taken place for an extended period of time and the child lacks an appropriate bond with the noncustodial parent,” there may be a basis in the law for a gradual reintroduction rather than just jumping into a normal parent-time visitation schedule.  How to proceed in these situations would best be determined by counseling with a lawyer experienced in these kinds of family law matters.